To what extent do we need evidence to support our beliefs in different areas of knowledge

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To what extent do we need evidence to support our beliefs in different areas of knowledge

Leseprobe I first heard The Ramayana and The Mahabharata, the famous Hindu epics, as a young child when I visited my grandmother during one of my summer vacations. I would sit on her lap on her favourite rocking chair while she, a skilled raconteur, retold the epics with verve and fervor.

In my callowness, I believed the events happened as dramatically narrated by her.

PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVES IN EDUCATION

For a practicing Hindu, like my grandmother, it is a matter of belief that the epics are faithful depictions of events as they transpired and are meshed into ancient Indian history. For a historian however, there is not a shred of evidence to support the epics.

No monuments, parchments or inscriptions of that period have been found so far. Considering the Bronze Age is around 3, BC, humans had not yet evolved to a level of sophistication to have the wherewithal for some of the reported incidents to happen.

If this is the case, how does a historian sift fact from fiction? This essay deals with History, the Human Sciences and Natural Sciences by examining how emotion, perception and biases influence our beliefs and the need for evidence to counterbalance them.

The Dead Sea Scrolls are an invaluable source of information about an early Jewish sect of the 2nd century BC — 2nd century AD called the Essenes in Palestine and of those biblical times. While tempting to straightaway accept the Dead Sea Scrolls as authoritative, a lingering doubt always persists if the scrolls are the ancient version of our paperback novel.

A finicky historian painstakingly dates and cross references the scrolls with material gleaned from The Old Testament, ancient Roman and Greek records and looks for corroborating evidence in other sources like coins, pottery, hieroglyphs, ancient biographies and other religious texts like The Talmud.

Although many theories exist, only those founded on irrefutable evidence become facts. Take the case of the famous iron pillar at the Qutab Minar, Delhi, India. The techniques used by ancient Indian blacksmiths to prevent corrosion of the pillar have baffled metallurgists.

The pillar is believed to be about years old, though some historians date it even earlier to BC. Many alternate theories for corrosion resistance like environmental factors and surface coating have been propounded. These remain theories until conclusively proven by modern metallurgists through rigorous experiments and studies.

Some even suggest that an unknown visitor from outer space built the pillar, but that remains a theory and belief until supported by irrefutable evidence.

Taflinger, What is Evidence? Cambridge University Press, In den Warenkorb Details Titel To what extent do we need evidence to support our beliefs in different areas of knowledge?However, our knowledge of how all trees are related to one another is not a fact; it is a complex body of knowledge based on many different lines of evidence and reasoning that may change as new evidence is discovered and as old evidence is interpreted in new ways.

Though our knowledge of tree relationships is not a fact, it is broadly. We need to continually reflect on our teaching and be ready to make changes when appropriate (e.g., something is not working, we want to try something new, the student population has changed, or there are emerging issues in our fields).

Epistemology - Wikipedia

Linking Classroom Assessment with Student Learning Listening. Learning. Leading. Classroom assessments do more than just measure learning. What we assess, how we assess, and how we communicate the results send a clear message to This concept — the need to use different sources of evidence — is true of all assessment types.

To what extent do we need evidence to support our beliefs in different areas of knowledge

Even. We need to use information in our thinking that is both relevant to the question we are dealing with, and accurate.

To what extent do we need evidence to support our beliefs in different areas of knowledge

We need to make logical inferences based on sound assumptions. We need to understand our own point of view and fully consider other relevant viewpoints. This paper explores to what extent we need evidence to support our beliefs in different areas of knowledge.

To do so, the paper cites examples from history, the Author: Shreya Challagalla. From Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines, Winter, Vol. XVI, No. 2. by Linda Elder.

Emotional intelligence is a topic that is attracting a considerable amount of popular attention. Some of the discussion is, in my view, superficial and misleading.

How far is evidence necessary to support our beliefs? by Tim Evans on Prezi